myKaarma & Creditcall team up to accelerate EMV chip card adoption for car dealerships

Car dealers can now simply switch to EMV, providing their customers the most secure payment solution while benefiting from reduced PCI DSS scope.

NEW YORK, NEW ORLEANS, NADA100 (Booth #5501), January 27, 2017 – Creditcall, the omni-channel Payment Gateway and EMV Kernel provider, today announced that it now supports myKaarma, the cloud-based conversational commerce software that’s revolutionizing the auto service industry. myKaarma can now quickly and easily add EMV chip card acceptance to its dealership app by using the Creditcall payment SDK – ChipDNA – which is pre-certified with First Data, one of the leading U.S. processors and the Ingenico Group’s iPP 350 smart payment terminal. More processors and payment terminals will be added in the following months.

myKaarma enhances the retail experience for service departments of car dealerships. The myKaarma app gives the dealership the ability to offer the latest customer engagement technologies such as digital conversations (text, email, voice) and smart payment systems for online and mobile point of sale (POS) with auto-reconciliation, all in one application that seamlessly integrates with the dealerships’ current dealer management system (DMS).

ChipDNA is an omni-channel, EMV-ready payment gateway solution for mobile, online, in-store and self-service card payment acceptance. It is aimed at software developers and can be integrated into Android and iOS based mobile POS (mPOS) payment solutions as well as Windows and Linux semi-integrated environments. It includes a comprehensive terminal management system (TMS), remote key injection (RKI) and point to point encryption (P2PE) for the highest level of cardholder data protection. Developers can choose from 38 different device manufacturer and processor combinations which reduces integration time and resources without the need for complex and lengthy processor certifications.

“We wanted a partner who already had years of EMV experience and a proven solution, knowing if we had any bumps along the way”

– Ujj Nath, CEO at myKaarma

“We wanted a partner who already had years of EMV experience and a proven solution, knowing if we had any bumps along the way, our partner will be able to support us and meet our needs in a timely manner” said Ujj Nath, CEO at myKaarma. “By leveraging ChipDNA, we were able to spend more time making our software even more valuable to our customers, rather than spending time trying to navigate the complex requirements of EMV”.

“Many developers and merchants still assume that replacing an old swipe card reader with an EMV chip card reader equals EMV compliance” says Jeremy Gumbley, CTO at Creditcall. “The reality is that true EMV compliance requires upgrading the entire payment infrastructure, involving several parties and complex moving parts. Once completed, there is still an ongoing requirement for maintenance and updates to remain compliant. We are proud to offer ChipDNA, which allows software developers like myKaarma to avoid the majority of headaches and address EMV with one simple, fast and future-proof integration” Gumbley continues.


About MyKaarma

myKaarma is a conversational commerce software company for automotive dealerships that focuses on enhancing the retail service department experience. myKaarma’s platform gives dealers the ability to offer their customers 21st Century technology through digital conversations and smart payment systems. myKaarma was named as an official communications and payments partner for Mercedes-Benz USA.

About Creditcall

Creditcall provides the tools to enable secure payment acceptance in-store, self-service, online or mobile. From retail and hospitality, to parking, vending, transportation or charity applications, Creditcall’s omni-channel Payment Gateway and EMV Kernels are at the very heart of its partners’ businesses, enabling them to focus on what they do best.

Creditcall is an EMVCo Business and Technical Associate, a PCI SSC Participating Organization, a Mastercard accredited MEPSA company and member of the U.S. Payments Forum with offices in Bristol, UK and New York, USA.

Chip-and-PIN, or Chip-and-Choice? EMV Liability Shift For PIN Transactions

With US EMV adoption well under way in the US, merchants are in the next phase of decision making for their EMV environment, for those terminals and solutions that support it. Should I force chip and pin when the issuer supports it, or should I allow chip and choice? It’s a tough decision and the answer is not the same for everyone.

Point-of-Sale (POS) systems vary in both implementation and capability. For example, a salesperson for a popular POS solution I spoke to told me they don’t support chip and pin. He actually said, “Since debit card processing costs are the same either way now with regulated debit, pin doesn’t really matter any more anyway.” Not true.

Consider the implications for a specialty retail environment with higher average value transactions, such as building supply, automotive parts, and electronics.

RETAIL: HIGH VALUE
FORCED CHIP & PIN CHIP & CHOICE
PROS Maximize profit potential 3 ways: highest security supported to shift counterfeit fraud to issuer; Even with regulated debit, there’s some financial differential for sending transactions via debit network, though vastly decreased. Finally, not all debit is regulated, and costs do vary. Less friction at the point of sale, faster checkout.
CONS While consumers know their debit pins, studies estimate consumers’ knowledge of credit card PINs at 5-10%. What is financial impact if customer cannot recall pin, fallback to signature is not allowed, and customer has no other payment method? Potential losses based on US EMV liability shift rules which require the highest level of security to shift back to issuer; may vary by brand for counterfeit, lost and stolen cards.

As with everything EMV, there are many moving parts to certifications for chip card acceptance. In order to have a choice, the merchants ecosystem from terminal to payment gateway, if applicable, acquirer, etc must all support it, which may be a tall order.

IMPORTANT: This article highlights a few items and does not cover all brand, business type, transaction type, card type, nor reasons for determining liability. Refer to various card brand core manuals or your acquirer for more specific details about EMV and card acceptance rules.

RESOURCES & ARTICLES AROUND THE WEB

To avoid issues with broken outside links over time, please copy the URL’s below into your browser.

https://www.mastercard.us/en-us/about-mastercard/what-we-do/rules.html

Chip & PIN vs. Chip & Signature

Best article for thoroughness. October 2014 http://krebsonsecurity.com/2014/10/chip-pin-vs-chip-signature/

Chip-and-PIN, or Chip-and-Choice?

Worth a look. February 10, 2014, By David Lott, a retail payments risk expert in the Retail Payments Risk Forum at the Atlanta Fed. http://takeonpayments.frbatlanta.org/2014/02/chip-and-pin-or-chip-and-choice.html

Chip & Choice Keeping Security Flexible

From Visa web site today, great illustration on impact of choices in different market segments. https://www.visa.com/chip/clients-partners/issuers/credit-card-chip-technology/chip-and-pin-choices.jsp

Chip-and-PIN vs. ‘chip-and-sig’

Good global overview and stats By Janna Herron · Bankrate.com, August 28, 2013
 http://www.bankrate.com/financing/credit-cards/chip-and-pin-vs-chip-and-sig/#ixzz4ALnE5Ps9
“What’s the difference? What separates the two is how each is authenticated at the register. Chip-and-PIN cards require a personal identification number to be entered to complete a purchase, much like how many debit card transactions are carried out now with magnetic stripe cards.” Read more: http://www.bankrate.com/financing/credit-cards/chip-and-pin-vs-chip-and-sig/#ixzz4ALnUjB9D

Visa Core Rules AND OTHER CARD BRAND RULES

merchant bulletins – downloads

 

 

Mastercard Chip Momentum: Reducing Fraud One Year In

Chip Cards in Market at 88 Percent as Chip-Active Terminals Reach 33 Percent

September 12, 2016 09:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time
PURCHASE, N.Y.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–At the one year anniversary of the shift to chip approaches in the U.S., Mastercard today unveiled data confirming the positive impact the technology is having on issuing banks, merchants and consumers. To date, chip adoption continues to grow:

“Payment cards are an essential part of commerce; EMV requires a change to the customer experience as the industry shifts from swipe to chip”

•    As of July 2016, 88 percent of Mastercard U.S. consumer credit cards have chips, representing a 105 percent increase in chip card adoption since the October 1, 2015 liability shift.
•    The company also sees 2 million chip-active merchant locations on its network, a 468 percent increase in chip terminal adoption since October 1, 2015. Two million merchants represent 33 percent of all U.S. merchants.
•    Of the 2 million chip-active merchant locations, 1.3 million are regional and local merchant locations, representing a 159 percent increase since October 1, 2015.
“Since 2012, Mastercard has championed chip technology. We need chip cards in wallets and chip terminals at checkout to continue to drive card fraud out of the U.S. This country is one of the most complex markets in the world so we know things won’t change overnight,” said Craig Vosburg, president of North America for Mastercard. “However, we’re encouraged by the significant progress over the last 11 months. With every additional chip transaction we move closer and closer to our collective goal – moving fraud out of the system.”
Chip Impact on Merchants
The biggest benefit of chip technology is minimizing the cost of fraud caused, in part, by the use of counterfeit cards. Now, the chips in terminals “talk” with the chips on cards creating unique codes for all purchases. The unique codes protect cards from being counterfeited.
Mastercard fraud data shows a 54 percent decrease in counterfeit fraud costs at U.S. retailers who have completed or are close to completing EMV adoption, when comparing April 2016 to April 2015. Demonstrating the power of EMV and the risk of not adopting it, counterfeit fraud costs increased by 77 percent year-over-year among large U.S. merchants who have not yet migrated or have just begun the migration to chip.
“Payment cards are an essential part of commerce; EMV requires a change to the customer experience as the industry shifts from swipe to chip,” said Brian Riley, director, Credit Advisory Service, Mercator Advisory Group. “There is no doubt chip cards will curtail fraud and it is exciting to see enhancements at the point of sale that will propagate usage, reduce friction and accelerate transaction time.”
Mastercard continues to work closely with merchant partners to ease the adoption of chip. Recent initiatives and programs have included: speeding the terminal certification processes from days to hours, while maintaining quality; adding more intelligence on its network to minimize chargeback costs to merchants; and introducing M/Chip Fast, a new application to help speed transactions and shoppers through checkout lines.
U.S. Consumers Prefer Chip
U.S. consumers have also been central to chip card adoption. While there was an initial learning curve on the chip experience, they now also are seeing the benefit of increased chip safety and security.
Chip card use continues to rise in the U.S. according to a recent Mastercard survey of over 1,000 U.S. consumers:
•    Nine-in-ten Americans commonly use chip cards, a 38 percentage point increase year-over-year, from 49 percent in 2015 to 87 percent in 2016.
“As more U.S. cardholders use their Mastercard chip cards, they are learning the benefits of increased safety and security. It’s no small undertaking to change the way people pay for things. The only reason to start this big a task is to make people’s lives better. Chips have the potential to do just that,” said Chiro Aikat, senior vice president of product delivery – EMV, Mastercard.
METHODOLOGY:
Braun Research conducted an online survey in the United States between June 27 and July 15, 2016 among a nationally representative sample of about 1,000 general population consumers, 18 years of age and older. The sample was weighted to be nationally representative of the US population as it relates to age, gender and region, as well as ethnicity/race. At the 95 percent confidence level, the margin of error is about +/- 3.1 percent.
About Mastercard
Mastercard (NYSE: MA), www.mastercard.com, is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. Mastercard products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter @MastercardNews, join the discussion on the Beyond the Transaction Blog and subscribe for the latest news on the Engagement Bureau.

Smart Card Market, Estimating Global Revenues to Surpass US$ 15,050.2 Mn By 2024

Jul 12, 2016 According to the latest market report published by Persistence Market Research, titled  Global Market Study on Smart Cards: Established Players Are Focusing on Smart Card Products For Telecom Application In Emerging Economies to Gain Better Market Access over Forecast Period 2016 – 2024. Smart cards continue to gain traction in terms of application in sectors such as telecom, government, and financial services. Global smart card market volume is expected to surpass 9,715 Mn units in 2016, representing market value of over US$ 8,576.3 Mn.

Smart card demand is escalating owing to high volume of adoption for government identity cards. In addition, increasing adoption of EMV chip technology as the global standard for credit card and debit card payments is projected to boost global sales of smart cards.

Contact cards will continue to be the largest card segment in 2016 as well, representing 64.0% revenue share of the global market. Contactless card – another key card type segment – is expected to account for US$ 1,735.0 Mn in 2016, which is an increase of 13.3% over 2015.

Among all smart card component types, micro-controller cards segment is expected to continue to account for highest value contribution, representing 71.5% revenue share of the global market in 2016.

Asia Pacific will continue to lead, with revenue share increasing to 47.9% in 2016. Increasing adoption of SIMs, EMV cards for banking applications, and increasing adoption of multi-use e-IDs for transportation and government sectors is anticipated to fuel growth of the smart card market in the region over the forecast period.

Gemalto N.V., Giesecke Devrient GmbH, Oberthur Technologies, and Morpho S.A (Safran) are some of the leaders in the global smart card market. The global smart card market is highly fragmented, with the top three players accounting for around 59.0% revenue share in 2015. Leading companies are looking to expand their production capacity, especially in Asia Pacific, which is one of the major smart card markets. Companies are also focussing on launching new smart card products for government and transportation applications, in a bid to cater to the growing demand for smart cards in emerging economies. The escalating demand for SIMs for telecom application is anticipated to boost growth of the smart card market. Developing economies are expected to remain key target markets for smart card manufacturers in 2016 and beyond.

Long-term outlook: PMR maintains a positive long-term outlook on the global smart card market, estimating global revenues to surpass US$ 15,050.2 Mn by 2024. In terms of volume, the global smart card market is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of 9.6% over 2016 – 2024.

American Express To Update U.S. Fraud Policies To Limit EMV Chargebacks for Merchants

Policy Changes Aim to Reduce Fraud Costs for Merchants While Promoting Further Adoption of EMV

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–In an effort to promote further adoption of EMV in the U.S., American Express (NYSE: AXP) today announced changes to its EMV chargeback policy to help merchants limit their fraud costs as they upgrade their point-of-sale systems. By the end of August 2016, merchants will not be held liable for chargebacks for counterfeit fraud when a transaction is under $25. In addition, by the end of 2016 American Express also plans to limit the number of counterfeit fraud chargebacks to a total of 10 per card account. The card issuer – not the merchant – will bear the financial liability for any additional counterfeit fraud transaction that is disputed on a card account after 10 chargebacks. This limit does not prevent a Card Member from disputing additional fraudulent transactions.

“We recognize the migration to EMV in the U.S. is an effort that will take time, which is why we are making these policy changes in order to provide flexibility to those merchants that may need more time to upgrade their point-of-sale terminals to accept EMV chip cards.”

“Combating fraud is an ongoing priority for American Express,” said Mike Matan, Vice President, Global Network Business, American Express. “We recognize the migration to EMV in the U.S. is an effort that will take time, which is why we are making these policy changes in order to provide flexibility to those merchants that may need more time to upgrade their point-of-sale terminals to accept EMV chip cards.”

The changes announced today by American Express will remain in effect until April 2018. The changes are expected to help reduce counterfeit fraud costs for merchants who have not yet upgraded their point-of-sale terminals to accept EMV chip cards. An analysis by American Express found that more than 40% of its counterfeit fraud chargebacks in the U.S. are for transactions under $25.

EMV technology reduces the risk of fraud stemming from counterfeit payment cards by storing information on a microprocessor chip embedded in a card. Card Members dip or insert their EMV chip cards into a merchant’s payment terminal instead of swiping their cards. Under a Fraud Liability Shift implemented by American Express in October 2015, the party – merchant or card issuer – with the least secure form of technology is responsible for counterfeit fraud costs.

American Express earlier this month announced the availability of Amex Quick Chip, which enables Card Members to dip their chip card during the check-out process and remove it before the transaction is completed. This can reduce the time Card Members must keep their Cards inserted in the terminal, providing an experience similar to swiping a magnetic stripe card and enabling merchants to streamline the checkout experience. American Express also offers merchant acquirers a self-certification program that allows them to perform the tests necessary to certify merchants’ point-of-sale devices for EMV chip card acceptance. The program enables merchant acquirers to complete the required POS certifications within as little as a few hours. Today, the vast majority of U.S. POS certifications on the American Express Global Network are performed using the self-certification program.

For more information about the self-certification program, merchant acquirers can visit: https://network.americanexpress.com/en/globalnetwork/certification/.

About American Express

American Express is a global services company, providing customers with access to products, insights and experiences that enrich lives and build business success. Learn more at americanexpress.com.